Boris Karloff Warner Bros. Triple Feature (Mod) from Warner Bros.

A cinematic icon, Boris Karloff was one of Hollywood’s greatest actors. Although synonymous with horror, Karloff excelled in other genres as well, providing a lasting legacy of memorable performances. And in this collection of three rarely seen gems drawn from his work at Warner Bros., Karloff shines in a wide range of roles, encompassing mystery, adventure and drama. West of Shanghai (1937): A wily warlord (Karloff) holds a small group of Americans prisoner in a northern China mission. The Invisible Menace (1938): Army intelligence suspects an ex-con (Karloff) of murdering the ordnance expert who framed him. Devil’s Island (1939): A French doctor (Karloff) wrongfully convicted of treason falls victim to the barbaric cruelties of the penal colony’s commandant.

Empire Of The Sun (Blu-Ray Book) (Blu-ray) from Warner Bros.

Based on J. G. Ballard’s autobiographical novel, tells the story of a boy, James Graham, whose privileged life is upturned by the Japanese invasion of Shanghai, December 8, 1941. Separated from his parents, he is eventually captured, and taken to Soo Chow confinement camp, next to a captured Chinese airfield. Amidst the sickness and food shortages in the camp, Jim attempts to reconstruct his former life, all the while bringing spirit and dignity to those around him.

Frisco Kid from Warner Bros.

In the 1850s, San Francisco’s Barbary Coast is a three-block hornet’s nest of saloon louts, floozies, blowhards, cutthroats, card cheats, gold fever and get-rich-quick swindlers. Bat Morgan (James Cagney) should do very well here. Previously cast in contemporary roles and in one larkish Shakespearean effort, Cagney plunges into his first period film with his fists and charisma at the service of a story tracing Morgan’s rise from shanghaied sailor to Barbary power broker. Margaret Lindsay, sharing a marquee with Cagney for the third time in 1935, plays the society demoiselle drawn to Morgan’s rough charm. And director Lloyd Bacon keeps thronged scenes of dance-hall excitement and mob vigilantism roiling with atmosphere.